CAN SANDERS SAVE THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY?

CAN SANDERS SAVE THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY? We need to end the two party political system. I believe the most effective way to do so is support Bernie Sanders and /or the nominee of the Libertarian party throughout the primaries. Libertarians and socialists forget that both seek the same benefits for the people; namely, the ability to exercise those personal liberties which are inherent in their humanity. Now obviously the two parties differ on how we achieve this goal, but that battle is best left for another day. The democratic and republican parties, on the other hand, represent oligarchies which want to suppress personal liberties to benefit the 1% and their own political agenda. Sanders is the exception and we know he is the real thing (not your typical politician) because of his history of integrity. So in my view supporting Sanders is not the same thing as supporting the existing democratic establishment. It is also consistent with supporting the best interests of America. If Sanders does not win the democratic nomination, those who do not subscribe to the “crony capitalism” of our present day two party system (i.e. the use of government regulation to promote special interests) should carefully consider their options. I, for one, do not believe (if Bernie loses) there is any hope that the democratic or republican parties (or the 1% they cater to) will ever appreciate that we, the people, are this nation’s greatest resource. If you agree then now is the time to let our … Continue Reading

HOW THE REPUBLIC OF THE UNITED STATES HAS BEEN CORRUPTED – PART TWO (Jury Trials)

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  Has the Supreme Court corrupted American homeowners right to a jury trial against lenders and servicers in federal courts? The Webster-Merriam Dictionary defines the verb “corrupt” to mean: : to cause (someone or something) to become dishonest, immoral, etc. : to change (something) so that it is less pure or valuable : to change (a book, computer file, etc.) from the correct or original form When I grew up in Iowa in the mid twentieth century we learned in high school “civics” class that our freedoms were preserved through a number of Constitutional checks and balances designed to protect the people from the arbitrary exercise of governmental power.  Two of the most basic checks on governmental power, i.e. “the separation of powers” in and “dual sovereignty” nature of our government, are derived directly from the governmental framework established by the Constitution. Shortly after it was ratified, the Constitution was amended by ratification of ten amendments, which are known as the Bill of Rights.  The right to a jury of one’s peers was one of the basic structural provisions our founders enacted pursuant to the Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment grants the right to trial by jury in criminal cases.  The Seventh Amendment grants the right to trial by jury in civil cases.