U.S. Mainstream Media is like China’s Free Press

U.S. MAINSTREAM MEDIA IS LIKE CHINA’S FREE PRESS At the Federal Candidates Forum in Everett Justin Murta, the Libertarian Candidate for Insurance Commissioner, commented on his bizarre interview with the Seattle Times. I smiled inside because I knew the process was rigged. That’s why I decided not to participate in that interview process and told the Times so publicly in this blog. The Mainstream media’s endorsements of my opposition are now out. Their endorsements are pretty much comical. What the Stranger writes about DelBene sounds more like indictment of a “do nothing- I won’t talk about anything” incumbent who does what the Democratic party tells her to do, rather than a  candidate who wants to represent the people of Washington’s Congressional District 1. Here is what the Stranger’s editorial board writes about DelBene: We nearly endorsed Alex Storms, a proud Bernie Bro with predator-looking facial hair because snoozy incumbent Suzan DelBene was SO FUCKING WISHY-WASHY. She’s the human equivalent of the goddamned shrug emoji. Should we abolish the superdelegates, Suzan? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Should our state tax carbon, Suzan? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Should Congress vote to recognize the Duwamish Tribe, Suzan? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Should all drugs be decriminalized, Suzan? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ We hated Storms, but at least he was willing to say where he stood. Abolish superdelegates: Yes. Carbon tax: Yes. Duwamish recognition: Yes. Drug decriminalization: No. The only thing DelBene seemed remotely enthused about was an obscure sales tax measure that would reclaim money from remote transactions for the state. Zzzzzzz. DelBene’s crushing dullness almost led us to endorse … Continue Reading

Thanks, but no thanks.

Thanks, but no thanks. Mainstream Media Endorsements are a Game I don’t want to play. My campaign received an email from the Seattle Times. It states: Hello, The Seattle Times editorial board has set aside Wednesday, June 29th, from 1:00 – 1:45 PM, to interview candidates for U.S. Representative, Congressional District 1.  The interview will be held at The Seattle Times offices, 1000 Denny Way, Seattle, WA  98109. Please confirm your attendance as soon as possible! We’ll have all candidates for this position in simultaneously to meet with members of the board, and the format will be Q&A.  I’ll send a reminder of the meeting the week prior, and include logistical information on visitor parking. I appreciate your flexibility — please don’t hesitate to contact me if you’ve got any questions or concerns. -Monica Monica G. Hinckley Administrative Assistant | Opinion I read the email twice and talked with several people about it. I have a busy schedule representing homeowners who are in danger of losing their homes. My office is in Arlington, Washington. It would likely take an hour or more each way to get to and back from the interview, which was only scheduled to last for 45 minutes… less than 15 minutes per candidate. “Hmmmm” I thought. “Doesn’t sound like they want to get to know much about any of the candidates.” I should also disclose my experience with the Seattle Times has not been good throughout the years. When I represented fishermen in the 1970s after the expansion of our nation’s exclusive economic … Continue Reading

WEED AND SEED

WEED AND SEED Two friends and I share a community garden. Gary Lennon does the lion’s share of the work. Gary wrote this. I am publishing it because it also is a great observation about life and politics. Gary writes: I’m into flowers and I’m not going to apologize.   In terms of propagation, there are always lots of volunteer re-starts. The editorial choice comes in the weeding out – I love little purple johnny jump-up in the strawberry bed, and when I’m weeding, I leave them in the ground. Ditto on the forget-me-nots – who wants their garden forgotten? If nasturtiums come back, I’ll transplant them to just where I want them. Every year, they come back. Purple potatoes shot through with orange nasturtiums define the look of our little hillside Eden. I left tall stands of Russian blue kale standing to go to seed. These kales have contributed to many a meal. Next year the upper bed will be full of seedings in the spring, and I will transplant and thin them, as I did with these giants three years ago. Notice the leek blooms – I saved a quarter row to flower (the blossoms are wonderful) so I could collect their seeds. Little dinosaur kale is from last fall – it wintered over and now will grow huge for fall. This is me (Scott) again. Here is a link to video series I have done on “Gardening and Government” which shares my thoughts about how government could be … Continue Reading