Stafne Challenges whether DelBene is a good Congressional Representative

Stafne challenges whether DelBene is a good representative when she won’t support Bernie The democratic party has put its Congressional representatives in an untenable, but familiar position by anointing them “super-delegates” but then requiring them to support Hillary regardless of the fact that Bernie is clearly the better candidate. Obviously, the democratic party has long since forgotten that under the United States Comstitution the role of a “representative” is to represent the people, not the democratic party. The dictionary defines “representative” to mean: ” having people who are chosen in elections to act or speak for or in support of the people who voted for them.” My opponent for Congress in District 1, incumbent Suzane DelBene said on her 2014 campaign web page that she wants to lead people. Specifically she writes: We need a leader who understands the power of innovation and who has the experience and determination to get things done in Washington, D.C. We need a leader who values creative and lasting solutions over empty partisanship. We need someone committed to the Democratic principles of honesty, integrity, equality of opportunity, and fair play. We need someone who will never lose sight of our shared commitment to the common good, but who also knows how to reach out across political divides to bring together diverse and competing interests to create progress. Given her steadfast refusal to support Bernie notwithstanding that he is the presidential candidate her constituents prefer one must wonder if she is content with the job … Continue Reading

Above all I am GRATEFUL

I am grateful to be a part of a spiritual movement designed to take our country back from the stomach of the empire which has swallowed it. It is not always easy practicing law while fighting off the empire. You have to take your lumps. But difficulties are often the source of new beginnings. Certainly, this is not how I envisioned spending my sixties when I was in my twenties. The Vietnam War began in November, 1955 and ended twenty years later in 1975. It was the last real war in the sense that American youth were conscripted from the general population and made to fight in a war that many of us believed should not have been fought. (Now the empire employs mercenaries to fight its endless wars having figured out that the people would not tolerate their children coming home in coffins unless they were paid to put their young lives in danger.) I was 20 in 1970 studying in London when I wrote “The Nakedness of Love”. I found the poem recently when I rummaged through boxes of my past. Although the poem is somewhat dated with regard to sexuality issues that are now being resolved, the third scene dealing with our government and politics still rings true. Scene 3: Act 1: Ashes are only ashes; Day is only day. Darkness always comes. It does no good to pray. The curtains will only open, they will never close. Man will become naked and refute all he knows. On … Continue Reading

Scott Stafne revisits his past and finds wisdom

Scott Stafne revisits his past and finds wisdom… Each memento comes with a soul weight that may overwhelm or be hidden from the moment in which it is revealed and recollected. The memories attached thereto are not only about me but the context of the society at that time… Sometimes we forget. It was as if I was being called to the boxes which stored my past. I really did not want to go there because my focus was on the present and how it could impact my future. But now that I am older I listen more to my callings. And so Saturday morning I opened the boxes and explored the various accumulations of a lifetime, including without limitation my birth certificate, draft card, poetry, plays, newspaper articles, and other mementos which had found their way into the boxes wedged into back of the pantry and the file boxes in my office. The first thing I noticed was that most of the papers were crinkled; some even appeared to have been snacked on. It is difficult to review mementos in the same way that I attack facts and documents when preparing to write a legal brief. Each memento comes with a soul weight that may overwhelm or be hidden from the moment in which it is revealed and recollected. The memories attached thereto are not only about me but the context of the society at that time. For example, on December 24, 2014 I wrote a blog entitled “Do we want police more devoted to one another … Continue Reading

HOW “DECORATION DAY” BECAME “MEMORIAL DAY” May 25, 2015

The practice of decorating soldiers’ graves is an ancient one. Reports and discussions describing the history of Memorial day in the United States suggests it evolved during and after the Civil War. The practice of devoting a day for decorating soldiers’ graves appears to have begun in the South; and was later copied in the North. There was no common agreement with regard to what day the soldiers should be honored. The practice of honoring soldiers killed by their countrymen in the Civil War war was not given a specific name and day until May 5, 1868 when General John A. Logan issued a proclamation calling for “Decoration Day” to be observed annually and nationwide. The call for local communities in the South and North to agree upon a common day for decorating the graves of all soldiers who died in the Civil War asked people to look beyond the reasons why the soldiers had fought that war in order to commemorate their deaths. “Memorial Day” was first used as a synonym for “Decoration Day” in 1882. But “Decoration Day” was not changed to “Memorial Day” officially  until 1967. Funny, that I do not recall the official name change. 1967 was the year I graduated from high school in Bettendorf, Iowa. The United States was in the midst of the Vietnam War. Maybe the reason I cannot remember is because we, the people, had already changed the name before the government got around to memorializing it. Did you know the … Continue Reading