THE EVOLUTION OF DEBT SLAVERY IN THE UNITED STATES IN MODERN TIMES – Part 2

THE EVOLUTION OF DEBT SLAVERY IN THE UNITED STATES IN MODERN TIMES  – Part 2  By Scott E. Stafne   Slate Magazine, January 18, 2011 Middle class wealth in the United States was a phenomena of Twentieth Century America. It resulted from those  people who performed labor and services being paid a fair split of the profits generated by the United States’ manufacturing and services economy. At some point the wealthy elites (including those which financed governments) focused on the American middle class as a source of revenue and a means by which to gain more power. Indeed, wealthy elites and those who represented them in the United States government devised a plan to rob America’s middle class of its wealth in exchange for cheap loans which would be necessary to maintain that class’ lifestyle until its demise was certain to occur. Government reduced the value of the labor performed by the middle class by exporting jobs overseas to impoverished peoples, who would accept much less than the trade unions had negotiated as being necessary for workers to live fairly in their local communities. At the same time, the elite’s money lenders ameliorated the effect of the loss of worker’s wealth by making cheap loans available for  several decades. This was a small price to pay for these hard money lenders conversion of America’s manufacturing and servicing economy into a debt based economy, that ultimately benefited from the destruction of the independence of America’s middle class by foreclosing on their … Continue Reading

THE EVOLUTION OF DEBT SLAVERY IN THE UNITED STATES IN MODERN TIMES – Part One

  THE EVOLUTION OF DEBT SLAVERY IN THE UNITED STATES IN MODERN TIMES – Part One                                                                                                                                                                         By Scott E. Stafne     I remember seeing my great uncle Edward C. Stafne for the last time at a party given by my cousin Anne Louise Hawkes in Redmond, Washington. I was in my late twenties. Uncle Edward was in his seventies. I had seen Uncle Ed on and off growing up when Mom, Dad, my brother Todd, and I would take road trips from Bettendorf, Iowa to visit my parents’ parents (Todd and my grandparents) in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Uncle Ed and his wife, and their son Eric Stafne lived in Rochester, Minnesota which was on the way to Minneapolis. Edward Stafne worked at the Mayo Clinic as an oral surgeon. Family lore and a newspaper article I once read stated that Uncle Ed gave a memorial address for each of the Mayo brothers at their funerals. Uncle Ed was the oral surgeon who in 1942 discovered a … Continue Reading